Reboot

“You will never be handed anything in life you cannot handle.” I believe these words of wisdom to be true. With the caveat, “Even though you may not think so at the time.”

And as my responsibilities for the care of my elderly mother continue to evolve, I have discovered I need to remind myself of this philosophy from time to time, caveat included. Most recently when I took my mother for her quarterly visit with her family physician.

The good news is that the results of my mother’s blood work showed all positive numbers. And physically she is doing as well as could be expected at 94-years-young. The hiccup came when the doctor pinged the status of her mental health, most specifically the decline in her short term memory.

When the doctor asked if she was experiencing any frustration or anxiety when she could not remember things, she replied she was noticing a lack of patience on her part recently. When the doctor asked her to give him an example, she was not able to reply immediately and instead, remained frozen in confusion.

I watched as both of my mother’s eyes looked to the left, then blinked, then looked to the right. She repeated this pattern a half a dozen times. She was trying to find the information in order to respond to the doctor’s question, but had no idea where to look for the answer. She was like a computer whose hard drive was ready to crash; it’s spinning wheel icon locked; frozen, not knowing where to find its system to reboot.

It was frightening to see the totally blank look on her face, with no recognition or ability to respond.

When prompted again by the doctor, she did manage to say she believed she had recently had lost patience with some situation, but could not recall what it was. She was waiting, she thought. For something rather than someone, she thought. And got annoyed when whatever she was waiting for was not happening right away.

This was the first time my mother had exhibited this type of behavior at this higher level during a visit with the doctor. I had seen snippets of this pattern before, but never this severe. It shook me to my core.

For a woman as intelligent and as independent as my mother, I know how frightening it has been for her to lose her mental abilities. But as time passes, I realize that the more she forgets, to a certain degree, the less frightened she is. She no longer remembers what she is forgetting, if that makes any sense.

It is these situations which prompt me to embrace the words of wisdom that I will never be handed any in life I cannot handle. And by doing so, I initiate a mental reboot of my own internal hard drive. I restart, reset my preferences and clear my cache. And with a fresh perspective, I keep putting one mental foot in front of the other. Because I know if I am going to be able to continue on this journey, I need to embrace the challenges as they come. And move ahead, one small step at a time.

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4 thoughts on “Reboot

  1. I think you’re exactly right about the more she forgets, the less things disturb her. My mother even had a catch phrase for the times memories escaped her: “Whatever.” It worked for us.

    • Love the “Whatever” catch phrase. Almost sounds like a classic tween or teenage response, doesn’t it? My mother’s typical response is “Oh, you know my memory these days!”, followed with a smile. And as long as she keeps smiling, I will do the same.

  2. Yes, MIL has NO insight into her condition, and never has. It’s a blessing, all things considered.

  3. It truly is a blessing, isn’t it? My challenge has been watching as my mother’s mental ability deteriorates and at a faster rate as more time passes. And the more time that passes, the harder it is to watch. But lately, knowing that she does not always understand what is happening to her has been my blessing.

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